Click here for our Newsletter Archives
 

 

FAQ

Why can't I just rely on my school to provide an appropriately challenging education for my bright child?

Why is it important for parents to understand the misbeliefs many educators hold about educating advanced and
gifted students?

How will the Center's Parent Guides for parents of high-ability math students and advanced readers/writers help my child?

Why are you offering a guide about taking the SAT for middle schoolers?

What kind of consulting services do you provide for parents?

What kind of consulting services do you provide for students looking toward college?

Are the Center's "Optimizing Your High School/Middle School/4th and 5th Grade Brain" DVDs just for advanced students?

What if I have other questions or need additional help?

 

Why can't I just rely on my school to provide an appropriately challenging education for my bright child?

Parents can’t assume that teachers have either the time or the training to appropriately educate advanced students.  76% of teachers in a recent national survey agreed that because of No Child Left Behind’s focus on low-performing students, “The needs of advanced students take a back seat.” The teachers also said they had received little to no training in how to best teach gifted students. If parents want their children to be academically challenged, and to love learning, they need to take an active role in their education, both inside and outside the classroom.

^Return to top links

Why is it important for parents to understand the misbeliefs many educators hold about educating advanced and gifted students?

Because so many educators haven’t been trained in gifted education,  many schools use inappropriate methods to educate advanced students.  These include having advanced students teach the other children, or placing them in mixed-ability “cooperative learning” groups, where they end up doing most of the work.  Schools are also resistant to using the educational approaches shown to best meet the needs of gifted learners, such as ability-grouped learning and acceleration in one or more subjects. Parents who are familiar with the research-based facts about gifted education can effectively advocate for educational approaches that will keep their child challenged, interested, and happy in school.

For more information about our report, "The Parent’s Guide to the Myths, Misinformation and Half-Truths Teachers Believe about Educating Gifted Students -- and How to Respond" please click here.

^Return to top links

How will the Center's Parent Guides for parents of high-ability math students and advanced readers/writers help my child?

Our advisors have spent years researching the resources and innovative approaches parents can use to successfully keep bright children academically challenged and interested in learning, both in the classroom and at home. We’ve collected that information, along with advice about negotiating with your school to provide more appropriate instruction for your child, into 40-45 page Parent Guides that help you address all aspects of your child's education.

For more information on our reports, "The Parent's Guide to Getting Your High-Ability Math Student the Education He or She Deserves," and "The Parent's Guide to Meeting the Needs of Your Advanced Reader/Writer," please click here.

^Return to top links

Why are you offering a guide about taking the SAT for middle-schoolers?

Each year over 86,000 middle schoolers take the SAT in order to participate in programs for gifted students run by institutions such as the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth and the Duke Talent Identification Program. Taking the SAT can be a daunting experience for middle-schoolers. Our report guides students through the task of preparing for the SAT, calming their anxiety and providing them with the information they need to perform at their best.

For more information on our guide, "The California Learning Strategies Center Guide for Middle Schoolers Taking the SAT," please click here.

^Return to top links

What kind of consulting services do you provide for parents?

We'll provide you with a multitude of individualized suggestions about resources and innovative approaches  – including distance learning programs, competitions,  mentors, publishing opportunities, creating clubs, and much more – to help your child develop his or her strengths and interests, both inside and outside the classroom. We'll also help you negotiate with your school to provide an interesting and challenging in-class program for your child. Additionally, we draft letters to teachers, schools, and school districts to help you advocate for your child. ($125/hour.)

For more information about our consulting services, please click here.

^Return to top links

What kind of consulting services do you provide for students looking toward college?

Today, colleges are looking for more than top grades, high SAT/ACT scores, and leadership in high school activities.  Colleges are looking for students with the initiative and passion to puruse their interests beyond this level.

We advise students about opportunities to develop their genuine interests in unique, challenging and enjoyable ways that will demonstrate their commitment and passion to admission committees. As we work with students, our goal is to help them pursue their interests through approaches that will not only enhance their college applications, but will enrich their future. ($175/hour.)

For more information about our college consulting services, please click here.

^Return to top links

Are the Center's "Optimizing Your High School/Middle School/4th and 5th Grade Brain" DVDs just for advanced students?

No, the "Your Brain" programs are aimed at helping all students understand their learning styles, and learn how to make studying and testing easier,  more effective and more fun. Students of all abilities find the programs helpful and enjoyable.

For more information on the "Your Brain" DVDs, please click here

^Return to top links

What if I have other questions or need additional help?

If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to call us at 805-642-6686. We're open from 9am to 6pm, Monday through Friday (Pacific Time), and Saturday from 12:00 - 3:00 (Pacific Time). You can also e-mail questions to Susan.Goodkin@LearningStrategiesCenter.com.

^Return to top links

 

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2009 California Learning Strategies Center. All rights reserved.